Podcast: Russian Strategy and Russia-US Relations

Three professors from Air University sit down to discuss the Russia-US relationship from a strategy and policy perspective.

Welcome to OTH’s next podcast! In this episode, OTH sat down with three professors from Air University to explore the tensions in the Russian-US relationship from a strategy and policy perspective. Our conversation begins with an examination of Russia’s current strategy towards the US, NATO and the West. We transition to a consideration of whether Russia should be perceived as a significant threat to US national security, and we conclude with a look at how the relationship between the two countries may evolve in the future. Each guest provides their recommendation for how the US can shape the global environment to potentially foster a more positive relationship with Russia. The complementary but disparate perspective of each guest ensues a dynamic conversation. Dr. Hampton, a NATO expert, provides a historically contextual view of the situation. She is balanced by Dr. Conversino’s nuanced analysis of hybrid warfare and Russia’s reflexive control. Dr. Connelly, a Russian culture expert, rounds out the team with a discussion of intimacy and ideology. Everyone agrees this situation is far from over, “the curtain has not closed,” as Dr. Hampton points out; both sides have an important part to play in shaping the future of the relationship between the two countries.

Click here to listen to the Podcast on SoundCloud
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Participants:
Maria Carver (Moderator)
Dr. Mary Hampton
Dr. Dan Connelly
Dr. Mark Conversino

Referenced during the conversation:
National Security Strategy of the United States of America
Russia National Security Strategy
The Baltic Security Puzzle
Gerasimov Doctrine
Operation Allied Force
Bretton Woods System
The Agony of the Russian Idea
Ender’s Game
The Road to Unfreedom
NATO Podcast

Dr. Mary Hampton is Professor of National Security and Course Director for the International Security I core course at the Air Command and Staff College. She was the Associate Dean for Academics at ACSC and has been Professor of National Security at ACSC since 2003. Prior to ACSC, Dr. Hampton was a Professor of Political Science at the University of Utah for 14 years, where she went immediately after receiving her PhD from UCLA. Her research focuses on International relations Theory, European security, German security and foreign policy, women and German politics, issues and identity in trans-Atlantic relations, Russian foreign policy, the media and foreign policy, and US foreign and security policy. Mary has published extensively on these topics and is currently working on a new book.

Dr. Dan Connelly is an Assistant Professor in ACSC’s Department of International Security. He is a recently retired U.S. Air Force intelligence officer, having completed tours at the headquarters and flying unit level, with multiple deployments to Southwest and Far East Asia. Dan also served as the Dean of the Air Force’s Squadron Officer College. He has published on topics in ethics, education, leadership and Former Soviet Union regional affairs.  He holds degrees in Russian studies, strategic intelligence and educational psychology.

 Dr. Mark J. Conversino is Professor and Deputy Commandant at the School of Advanced Air and Space Studies. He also teaches in the Air War College’s (AWC) Regional and Cultural Studies program, focusing on Russia and the former Soviet Union.  From 2008 to 2015, he served as Dean of the AWC, joining the faculty there following his retirement from the Air Force.  Dr. Conversino earned his Ph.D. from Indiana University and is the author of the book Fighting With The Soviets: The Failure of Operation FRANTIC, 1944-1945, which was also published in Ukrainian.

The views expressed are those of the participants and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the Department of Defense or the U.S. Government.

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